Archives For Transmedia Storytelling

Great Wave Data

October 16, 2016

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With augmented reality (AR) and virtual reality (VR) becoming the next computing platforms, app developers have been increasingly focused on building AR and VR apps.

One of the companies that aim to be on the cutting edge of Analytics VR and AR app development is GREAT WAVE. By helping people understand and analyze data more quickly, such a tool could provide richer, more insightful experiences than the ones derived from paper and screens. Studies conducted by researchers at Stanford and by the neuroscience and analytics team of the AR developers META (in conjunction with Accenture) demonstrate how the use of 3D information could amplify people’s efficiency and ability to focus on tasks.

Have a look at the video of GREAT WAVE:

 

Octagon AR +

June 4, 2016

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Worked with the Octagon AR platform. Octagon AR is an application that allows users creating their own marker to display 3D models from their library or the user´s personal library. Interesting, and useful applications for education.

Artificial Theatre

May 15, 2016

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I invited Louis-Philippe Demers for a talk at our CGI – International Seminar series.

Louis-Philippe Demers makes large-scale installations and performances. His projects can be found in theatre, opera, subway stations, art museums, science museums, music events and trade shows. Over the past two decades, he participated in more than seventy artistic and stage productions and has built more than 350 machines.

Demers was Professor of Digital Media and Exhibit Design/Scenography at the Hochschule fuer Gestaltung Karlsruhe, affiliated to the world renowned Zentrum fuer Kunst und Medientechnologie (ZKM, Germany). Since he joined the Interaction and Entertainment Research Centre and the newly founded School of Art, Design and Media at the Nanyang Technological University.

On the talk: Theatre has always been the test bed of illusions. The illusion of the actor replaced by a machine signifies the fantasies found in the scientific and the science-fiction communities. However, what Louis-Philippe Demers is targeting here is not the artifice but the uncomfortable communalities between the flesh and the mechanical bodies. Having these radical encounters at the liminal space bordering man and machine, it forces audiences to (re)consider their human bodies and the latest transforms in the history of their own embodied experiences.

Augmented Narratives

March 7, 2016

I started my new research-project on Augmented Narratives which will involve the platforms of META2 and OCTAGON. For users, good UX-design for Augmented Reality platforms should facilitate physical and psychological immersion in the mediated experience. A holistic, multi-dimensional approach that incorporates qualitative experience and a deep understanding of the psychological aspects of optimum user experience are an imperative for such environments to be successful.

The creation of such a flexible, holistic, and enveloping environment that allows well-tuned variations and personalized adjustments, requires new forms of digital storytelling and the application of new user experience-design paradigms – based on a deep knowledge of the users’ data-scape. How can we can assess and organize these new worlds – in order to create the best experiences?

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Magic Leap

October 26, 2015

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Magic Leap, Inc., a developer of novel human computing interfaces and software, announced in a newsletter the recent closing of its A round of venture capital. Magic Leap has now raised more than $50 million in its series seed and A rounds to develop its proprietary technology platform. Magic Leap will use the funds to advance the product development and commercialization of its proprietary human computing interface technology, known as “Cinematic RealityTM”.

At engagdet – Mariella Moon states that she can’t decipher what Magic Leap exactly is – but she argues that Magic Leap is:

a headset that superimposes digital images onto the real world. In that respect, it’s similar to Microsoft’s HoloLens, which is just slightly less mysterious (since we’ve actually seen it). But based on the things Abovitz said in his AMA at reddit, like “Our vision for AR and VR is a true replication of visual reality,” there’s a chance that it can also block the outside world entirely with virtual reality. (Update: Rachel Metz confirmed to engagdet on Twitter that it’s capable of doing full VR.)


This points out  that there’s a reason why the company is calling its technology “cinematic reality” rather than AR or VR: it works a bit differently than either of them. Standard AR and VR use stereoscopic 3D, a technique that tricks you into thinking an object is three-dimensional by showing each eye a different image and a different angle of the same object. The Oculus Rift and Samsung’s Gear VR headset are two well-known examples of this technique.

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In his AMA Abovitz revealed that he’s not a fan of stereoscopic 3D and believes it can cause “temporary and/or permanent neurologic deficits.” So, Magic Leap uses a Lilliputian projector to shine light and images into the user’s eyes instead, the startup told Metz from MIT’s Technology Review. Your brain apparently won’t be able to detect the difference between light from the projector and light from the real world: The result is life-like digital images that show reflections like real physical objects would.

Sources:

Magic Leap

reddit

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perception cinema

Largely through trial and error, filmmakers have developed engaging techniques that capture our sensations, thoughts, and feelings. Philosophers and film theorists have thought deeply about the nature and impact of these techniques, yet few scientists have delved into empirical analyses of our movie experience-or what Arthur P. Shimamura has coined “psychocinematics.”

This edited volume introduces this exciting field by bringing together film theorists, philosophers, psychologists, and neuroscientists to consider the viability of a scientific approach to our movie experience.

Augmented reality describes the process of using technology to overlay virtual information onto the real world to ‘augment,’ or add value, to our experience. Augmented reality applications are unique in that because they project virtual information into a user’s physical environment, they effectively blend real and virtual. They are also increasingly mobile and social. These features amplify the level of impact and persuasive power of the user experience — when done right.

All kinds of things go into success. And you might argue that usability is the key. But at the highest level, success depends on more than usability; it depends upon user experience. User experience is more than all those things combined. Of course, you still need to follow best practices for good usability because if people can’t do something they can’t be persuaded by it. But usability is no longer a key differentiator. It’s not enough.

Pamela Rutledge, Media Psychologist, Social Media and Transmedia Storytelling Strategist at the Media Psychology Research Center, gave the following presentation on these topics recently at WorldComp12 EEE.

Presentation overview:
1. Defining engagement
2. The need for a holistic evaluation of user and customer experience to achieve engagement.
3.  The role of the of the brain in achieving psychological engagement and outline the 3-brain model that you can use as a rule of thumb in your design and marketing decisions
4. Mapping brain behavior on to two theories of optimal engagement: Flow and Narrative Transportation.   Flow is optimal engagement for task-based activities.  Using story or narrative is an equally powerful way to achieve optimal engagement in narrative-based products and properties where the goal is experiential rather than task-based.
7. The similarities and differences between Flow and Narrative immersion as goals are critical to designing, developing and evaluating mobile and immersive technologies like AR.
8. Introduces the Positive Engagement Evaluation model