Archives For Conferences

Models of Diversity

March 11, 2016

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Gave a talk on New Narratives at the conference Models of Diversity at the ETH and ZHDK Zurich.

The main aim of this conference was to create 3-way discourses to search for correlations and models that can foster deeper creative levels of discourses across the disciplines of art, science, sociology and philosophy. A round table conference with paired presentations of art researcher, scientists and theorists in diverse fields of inquiry-alongside dynamic moderators who tried to stimulate discourse.

Understanding Perception

October 10, 2015

Lazy Chief, a Studio in London, translated the studies of neuroscientist Beau Lotto into motion design.

The 4-minute short film explains the way that evolution has shaped the way we perceive the world.

One important statement for visual designers, is that our brains don’t differentiate between imagined stimuli and real stimuli. Professor Lotto explains:

[W]hat’s remarkable is that when we imagine something, it activates the same part of our brain as if we’re actually seeing it. So imagined perception is the same as a real perception.

This has tremendous impact for thinking about the narratives that a culture tells itself.

The Leviathan Project

January 10, 2014

On January 6th 2012, at the Intel Pre-Conference Keynote at CES in Las Vegas – for the first time in public – Intel and USC World Building Media Lab unveiled the Leviathan – a giant Whale that swims above an audience of 5000, all reaching out to touch the creature flying overhead.

From the presentation:

We bring you an experiment in storytelling that shatters the membrane between audience and content. The Leviathan Project creates an immersive world in which audiences can engage, explore and physically experience virtual environments and fantastic characters.

We are playtesting a future where the design of a world precedes the telling of a story, and the richly detailed world becomes a container for countless narratives.

What Is 5D?

5D Institute is a cutting edge USC non-profit Organized Research Unit dedicated to the dissemination, education, and appreciation of the future of narrative media through World Building.

World Building designates a narrative practice in which the design of a world precedes the telling of a story; the richly detailed world becomes a container for narrative, producing stories that emerge logically and organically from its well-designed core.

World Building is founded on three beliefs, namely that storytelling is the most powerful system for the advancement of human capability due to its ability to allow the human imagination to precede the realization of thought; that all stories emerge logically and intuitively from the worlds that create them; and that new technologies powerfully enable us to sculpt the imagination into existence.

5D Institute is the world’s leading World Building collective. Our network of preeminent World Builders transcends borders and boundaries in film, animation, fashion, gaming, theatre, television, music, architecture, science, interactive media and more.

Through the newly cemented partnership with USC School of Cinematic Arts, 5D Institute is evolving into an unmatched connector between the next generation of young and undiscovered creators traversing the bleeding edge of innovation and companies who want to be at the frontlines of the new media landscape.

Since Oct 2008, we have come together at 5D’s distributed events to engage in a disruptive interrogation of our fractured disciplines, to create best practices and a new shared language across narrative media.

‘The neural sparking between left brain and right brain is at the core of 5D – we are moving into a landscape where art and science, design and engineering are inseparable. At their intersection lies the new creative laboratory for the future of our narrative practices.’

– Alex McDowell, 5D Institute Director

For more information:  5dinstitute.org/

gamification_world_asia
Gamification World Asia Pacific 2012 summit is the ONLY event in Asia Pacific dedicated to exploring how gamification will transform your organization’s marketing and branding strategies, customer and employee engagement campaigns and enterprise performances, supported by case studies. Taking place in Singapore 28th – 29th November 2012.

Download the brochure

Catch up on all the insights from our NESTA’s Digital You-Event which looked at telepresence and the psychology of electronic communications. This event explored how robotics and new collaboration tools can emulate being there in person, and how we can make better use of email and video conferencing without ‘information overload’

The UK Design Council, in partnership with the UK Department of Health, ran a national competition to find teams of designers and experts who could develop new ideas to help improve the lives of those affected by dementia, reports Dexigner.

Guided by in-depth research and working with those affected by dementia, the five teams developed the innovative concepts for products and services.

A fragrance-release system designed to stimulate appetite, specially-trained “guide dogs for the mind,” and an intelligent wristband that supports people with dementia to stay active safely, are just some of the design prototypes to help people live well with dementia unveiled by UK Care Services Minister Paul Burstow at the Design Council.

The Design Council, in partnership with the Department of Health, ran a national competition to find teams of designers and experts who could develop new ideas to help improve the lives of those affected by dementia. Guided by in-depth research and working with those affected by dementia, the five teams developed the innovative concepts for products and services. The resulting prototypes will be further tested and developed with commercial partners with the aim of making some or all of them available on a large scale as soon as possible.

“A consequence of an aging population is a threefold increase in dementia over the past twenty years,” said David Kester, Chief Executive of the Design Council. “That means there are many millions of people who need new products and services designed to meet their changing needs. This project demonstrates that if you put the people who are living with dementia, including carers, at the centre of the design process, you end up with rapid and inspiring innovation. It’s just what we need right now – both for our local communities and for UK enterprise.”

Read article

More: “The capital of the forgetful” is a revealing BBC report by Louis Theroux on what living with dementia actually means.

The premise of Raphael Kim‘s project at Design Interactions‘ work in progress show –which closed a couple of days ago at the Royal College of Art– contained all the ingredients to intrigue me: The falling cost and increase in speed of DNA sequencing has given rise to two extreme scientific worlds: giant pharmaceutical companies who trawl the Arctic Ocean in search of potent genes that would profit them in a lucrative cancer market; and DIY biologists who try to beat the system.

The designer imagined a gene hunting device that biohackers (who usually cannot afford to ‘trawl’ the oceans) would create to collect gene samples present in the air.

The device would rely on rotifers, tiny animals capable of absorbing environmental DNA, that have been genetically programmed to start glowing as soon as a target gene is spotted in their environment. The rotifers sit inside a chamber attached to the gene hunting device, and wait for the targets to come near. This kind of “LED switch” can be obtained by fusing a commercially-available fluorescent gene with a part of rotifer’s own DNA (see image on the left).

A motor spins at high speed to draw the air onto the sampler while the outer mesh of the device protects the delicate samplers and filters out large, unwanted particles.

In-line with biohacking philosophy, these actions can be done, in theory, using an open-source data and hardware available to the public. Ever since the complete DNA sequence of human has been made public, genetic maps of other organisms have been published gradually, including those of rotifers, on free online database such as GenBank. Many other pieces of biohacking equipment can either be made at home or can be purchased on ebay.

Via Regine at we make money not art.